Thursday, October 29, 2009

Ernest Hemingway's papers arrive at the JFK Library

Despite the strained relations between the USA and Cuba, the curators of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and the Castro regime have managed to find common ground over Ernest Hemingway. In fact, the Boston Globe noted in an October 29, 2009 article that Cuba has shared copies of 3,000 letters and documents from the Hemingway archives at the country’s Ministry of Culture. This material filled a hole in the library’s collection, which probably contains the most comprehensive body of Ernest Hemingway’s writings.
The Boston Globe further noted that:
The initial collection of the author’s work made its way to the library after Hemingway’s fourth wife, Mary, received permission from the Kennedy administration to travel to Cuba after Hemingway committed suicide in 1961 in Idaho, three months after the disastrous assault at the Bay of Pigs helped usher in the decades-long pall over US-Cuban relations. The Cuban regime had told Mary that they intended to make the house Hemingway left just outside Havana, known as the Finca VigĂ­a, into a museum. They allowed her to visit and ship his many papers and artwork on a shrimp boat to Tampa.
The entire Boston Globe article can be read here.


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